The Award Winning Recipe For Captivating Captions that Convert and Engage

When it comes to writing copy or captions, here is a great recipe to follow:

  • Headline: Create a compelling headline. Instagram only shows a certain amount of a caption before a reader has to click “show more.” This means that you have very few words to grab a reader’s attention that compels them to make the next action step of clicking “show more.” You can either have a great title, give an answer or ask questions.

  • The body of your caption needs to either inform, persuade, convince or do all three. In doing this you will qualify your audience. Ask them if they can relate to what you are talking about.

  • You need to have a direct call to action. People will not do things unless they are asked or told to do so. Include things like “comment below” “save this post” “send this to a friend” “like this photo”

  • Stay focused on the reader. They are reading your caption for themselves. Keep focused on using “YOU.” Give specific value and relate it to your own personal story to develop authority.

  • Be relatable when you are writing your captions. You can’t be unobtainable or out of their relevant world. Get on their level and keep it simple.

  • Give them a picture of the future to qualify your audience again. Show them what their life would look like when you help them, prepare them to say “yes” to your call to action

  • Create an irresistible CTA and a deadline. If you are promoting your product or service you need to be very clear with your deadline. Give that call to action and tell them when an end date is.


Below is a caption that worked very well in one of my posts: 

“When you know something is going to be hard, or the consequences of doing something is going to require work....you DON’T want to do it.

You start to make excuses. You justify why you aren’t doing what you need to be doing and avoid, avoid, avoid.

Sometimes you’re very aware of how badly you need to do something, but you continuously don’t “show up” or “put in the work” to make the change.

Maybe it’s living a healthier lifestyle, eating better and starting to go to the gym. Perhaps it's confidence issues and self doubt that you know you need to work on. Even small things like checking your bank account, checking your grades, having a conversation with someone you know you need to have.

Knowing if you sign up to a gym or you apply to participate in group classes to work on your confidence, you are financially putting yourself on the hook.

You are going to have to get up and go do the work.

The work may require you to do research, pay to eat healthier, pay for a gym, read some books, do some deep internal reflection, have difficult conversations. Not only do you have to put in the work for yourself, but you have friends and family or even the internet that watches what you do and you feel like if you start something you can’t fail at it.

The bigger the goal you have, the more you have “on the line” and the more you put yourself “on the hook.” This is what I like to call formidable friction.

What helps me through formidable friction? Knowing that if I stay where I’m currently as and I don’t make the change I KNOW I need to make...I am going to have to deal with the repercussions and consequences.

If I don’t go to the gym and eat healthily I’m not going to retain my current health and I’m going to have to deal with diabetes, heart problems, bad knees and ankles, worse self-confidence issues.

So many of us are blocked by this friction that inhibits us to reach our full potential. Take some time to understand why you may be experiencing this friction. The thoughts and emotions you’re having. When you try and understand feelings like anxiety, fear, and stress it can tell you a lot!

Have you ever felt formidable friction?”


You’ll notice I have a title headline that almost everyone can relate to:

When you know something is going to be hard, or the consequences of doing something is going to require work....you DON’T want to do it.”

The reader can go “that’s me! I can totally relate to that.” So now they click “show more” and I am still going to be speaking about the reader, not myself.

“You start to make excuses. You justify why you aren’t doing what you need to be doing and avoid, avoid, avoid.

Sometimes you’re very aware of how badly you need to do something, but you continuously don’t “show up” or “put in the work” to make the change.”

My audience is going to be nodding their heads saying “yes I have done this before, I can relate.”

From there I go in deeper with examples so I can show my audience I relate to them and I understand them.

I am trying to inform and persuade my reader. Since I do not have a product or service I am trying to sell, my call to action is just a simple question to get my reader to think at the very end.

Remember that this is a basic recipe, at the root of everything as long as your audience feels something your captions will convert. Like all recipes, they can be slightly modified to fit your needs or requirements, but this is an excellent framework to get started.